Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

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Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Shado-cabinet
Hi Guys

Whilst I am still trawling through the DVD boxset of UFO (I know it is taking a really long time but it seems I don't really have all  that much time these days etc) I have also been reading some of the excellent UFO Fanfic on the SHADO Library site (links are below). I do think it is a good idea to direct any N-UFO fans to this site to some of the finer examples of UFO fanfic that are out there

One of these Fanfic stories is the excellent 'How it Ended', a two-parter written by Anthony Appleyard.
Like the title suggests it tries to bring a sense of closure to the UFO story since the TV show failed to do this itself (which is indeed strange given that producers Lew Grade/ Anderson really planned for one season only).  In fact the 1st UFO novelisation actually does speculate how it 'might' end with Alec Freeman imagining that UFOs would simply stop coming (due to the alien race either dying off or simply finding another planet to raid), and that Straker would live out his life as a  sort of caretaker for the SHADO base in case the alien threat returns etc.

In 'How it Ended' the author has a much more interesting idea with the Aliens trying to reveal themselves to, and integrate with,  the human race. It starts off the Aliens kidnapping a load of students (who are electronics experts) who help them upgrade their weapon systems from lasers to missiles as they are better to use in space combat. The  aliens then launch an attack on moonbase which results in a number of SHADO interceptors being destroyed. At the same time a fleet of UFOs land in Scotland and the students are released to the world media who reveal that UFOs are real and that they are our 'friends' ( they also 'out' SHADO as a hostile organisation who were  stopping the aliens from contacting humanity). As a result SHADO loses its cover as a 'film studio' and Straker has to contend with all the public scrutiny etc. SHADO also has to contend with a small friendly alien faction (of the same mindset of the alien defector in the AQOP episode) who have deserted their home planet and have settled in the UK (even one of  them successfully runs for a seat in Westminister, replacing a former MP who was an ally of Straker). As a result these aliens share their technology with the world by setting up factories that build UTC craft (UFO technical craft) which a number of companies & governments purchase (including SHADO to replace its interceptors). It is interesting to note that the author coins the cool-sounding term of  'Spinners' to describe the UFO craft of the TV series

This development actually turns the world into a 'UFO frenzy' with thousands of people flying into space (ie: astronomers to study star constellation, asteroid miners to prospect in other systems, government agencies scouting planets for new bases etc), which results in SHADO evolving from a secret agency countering UFO threats into a sort of 'space coastguard' trying to police all these different groups within the solar system. Its both interesting & amusing to read Straker trying to manage all these issues as sort of 'bureaucratic Captain Kirk', whilst at the same time working with the Astrophysical Commission (still chaired by General Henderson) to find out more about the aliens on earth. Straker finds out that there are some governments aiding the aliens with DNA technology (ie: to counter 'transplant organ' rejection), as well as access to organs supplied by genetically-modified pigs etc (he also finds out that some corrupt governments are also supplying their most dangerous prison inmates to the aliens for transplantation).
Straker also contends with some bizarre organisations such as France's  police group CRS (Crime Riot Squad) that have been setup with UTC craft to try seek out the Aliens homeworld.

Eventually Straker is a given task force of UTC craft with an army of SHADO/ CIA commandos to try and locate the Aliens homeworld. During this space mission Straker encounters another alien race who were plagued by UFO attacks and have set up a SHADO-style organisation called the 'Space Guard' to combat them (but Straker learns that this new alien world is controlled by an 'isolationist dictatorship' whose Space Guard is also used to stop their citizens flying into space by shooting down any rockets ships leaving their planet).

The space mission finally results in Straker locating the homeworld of the UFO-aliens and finding out about their civilization and meeting their leader which matches the official depiction of aliens in the UFO Story 'The Snatch' in issues 32-37 of the Countdown comic (a badly executed story IMHO where the supposedly 'mysterious' aliens are so clumsily revealed to Paul Foster when he is abducted to their homeworld,  and who eventually outwits 'Robart - the alien leader' by conveniently stealing a  UFO and flying back to earth - LOL).

However in the 'How it Ended' story the author gives the mysterious aliens a much more epic flourish which gives them much more depth. The author actually provides a name for this Alien race (which actually sounds pretty cool), as well as examples of their complex alien language. He even provides an insight into their culture & religion. And kudos to the author,  these additions really do work well and it certainly seems like such a suitable context for the aliens to the extent that you could imagine this being used by the producers had the show had gone onto a second season etc.

BTW in this story The aliens are also depicted as being almost albino in skin tone under the 'temporary greenish-tint from breathing liquid oxygen' of their faces (which coincides with the TV series early concept of the aliens being albinos such as the 'albino black man' that was rejected by the producers at the last minute as being a bit too scary etc).  

The only differences in the authors depiction of the aliens and the TV show is that they do not appear to be outwardly psychic in anyway (whereas it is insinuated in some episodes ie: ESP & Kill Straker that some aliens may be psychic etc). Also in the 'IDENTIFIED'episode it is insinuated that aliens are all sterile and are unable to procreate which is why the need to keep themselves supplied with transplant so that they can try & live 'forever'. Whereas in the 'How it Ended' story the aliens are not all sterile and can conceive children but that they suffer from a genetic mutation (caused by an ancient plague on their planet) which results in frequent organ failure among the populace hence the constant need for organ transplants etc.

The premise of the Aliens suddenly integrating with humanity (in a limited & controlled way) seems fairly believable. One thing I like about this story is that it tries to explain the few plotholes that appeared in the TV show (here it is mentioned that the SHADO spy satellite that featured in the 'Close Up' episode contained an 'engine-block' that was taken from a crashed UFO (which the SHADO scientists were unable to reproduce etc) but when placed in the satellite it allowed it to fly at SOL speed to the alien planet for 'single use only' etc). The author also states that SHADO experts were eventually able to confirm that the magnification of the pictures taken of the alien planet were indeed correct (finally exorcising that silly plot-device at the end of the 'Close Up' episode where it is insinuated that the pics maybe of some alien's thigh etc). Also the writer thankfully disregards the theory suggested by Dr Jackson ( as does the Countdown comic strip) in the awful 'Cat with 9 lives' episode that the aliens could be 'formless beings' who takeover human bodies (a really stupid & unnecessary take on the Captain Scarlett series IMHO).

The only flaw I could find with the 'How it Ended' story is the quality of the grammar & writing used in part 1. The author was too busy writing the story down that he did not seem concerned with editing or proof-reading which results in a bit of a challenging read at first (especially when really unusual and sometimes unnecessary subplots literally just 'jump into the narrative' etc). But I would definitely recommend that the reader perseveres as there is great imagination in the story that is definitely worth reading. Thankfully part 2 has better editing & writing (and also has a nice summary of the events of part 1 in the introductory chapter) and is overall superior to part 1. The only disappointment is that the ending in part 2 is a little bit rushed (that could mean that the author is still working on part 2 and this is just a 'rough version' or that there is hopefully a 'part 3' somewhere in the works etc)

All in all I would definitely recommend any UFO fan (either newbie or veteran) to read 'How it Ended parts 1 & 2' to  see exactly how the UFO series could have closed etc (or indeed 'should have closed'? )

link to part 1 of 'How it Ended' :

https://www.shadolibrary.org/library/anthony/ended.htm

link to part 2 of 'How it Ended' :

https://www.shadolibrary.org/library/anthony/end2.htm


I hope you guys read & enjoy the story as I did.  Right now I am going to check other UFO fanfics (such as the 'Shepherd' etc :)
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Clare Cross
Thanks for that review.  Sounds like typical insane fan-fiction that chooses to retain or dismiss whichever bits of the series the author likes or dislikes.  How are the Aliens able to survive on Earth, as it was shown quite clearly in the series that they age rapidly once in contact with our atmosphere.  Of course, if they were Alien minds somehow transplanted into 100% human bodies then this would be a way of avoiding this.  Oh, hang on... the author has dismissed this idea.  A much better solution, by the way, to explain the nonsense in 'Close Up' would be that the UFO's pilot, knowing that he was being followed, led the B142 astray and put it into orbit around, let's say, Pluto.  How long would it take light or radio signals to travel from Pluto to Earth?  I've no idea, but I bet it would be a darn sight quicker than if they were coming from the other side of the galaxy!  

Also, you keep referring to 'The Cat With Ten Lives' as 'The Cat With 9 Lives'.  Come on... keep up!  Get with the program, dude.  
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Shado-cabinet
Hi Clare

I'm sorry I keep getting the full title of the 'Cat' episode wrong :(

Well I think its a little unfair to the authors to dismiss their work as 'insane' without at least checking them out first (I mean the whole concept around fanfic is that it is a 'what if ' scenario).

The author does actually address the plot-device of the TV show were aliens are shown to age rapidly when exposed to earth's atmosphere. In the 'How it Ended' story it is revealed that the alien scientists have placed a drug in their helmet systems that is pumped into the liquid-oxygen solution which slowly causes the rapid-aging when the helmet is removed (its basically like a 'suicide pill' to kill the UFO-pilot if he is ever captured). Most of the UFO pilots are unaware of this 'suicide pill' solution in their helmets as a security measure (so as to kill them if they decide to defect SHADO etc). But sometimes this 'suicide pill' fails to kick-in when the helmet is taken off (which can also explain the 'Computer Affair' episode where the alien has had his helmet off for a long time and appears to be unaffected by the atmosphere). In the 'How it Ended' story the author explains that the group of aliens who defect to Earth found out about the 'suicide pill' solution in their helmets and disabled it prior to escaping their homeworld (this can also explain why the alien defector in the 'A Question of Priorities' episode had obviously taken off his helmet and appeared to be unaffected by the atmosphere, ie:  he disabled the 'suicide pill' function of his helmet).

The author is correct to ignore the Dr Jackson theory presented in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode since the writers & producers of the UFO strip in the Countdown comic have also ignored this. In 'The Snatch' serial the aliens on their homeworld are shown to be humanoid beings who all know how to perform organ transplants because they frequently require them in order live forever (ie: no 'formless beings' possessing earth abductees ala 'Captain Scarlett' etc). And since the Countdown comic is basically an Anderson production then the UFO strip is a definitive companion piece to the TV show (and the alien homeworld presented in the 'How it Ended' story does match this depiction in the comic, and so is arguably more 'canon' than the theories presented by Dr Jackson in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode etc).

And the author is correct to try and attempt to fill-in the glaring plot-hole of the 'Close Up' episode ( by having SHADO scientists place a UFO engine block in the B142 probe rather than have the probe follow the UFO using rocket engines which would take decades to reach its destination).  Your own theory of the UFO pilot spotting the probe and leading it back to Pluto is also a good one (the only problem is that SID would have detected the UFO & the trailing probe returning to the solar system )

But I would definitely recommend any UFO fan to read the 'How it Ended' story if only as a 'what if' scenario on how the UFO series 'could' have ended.
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Clare Cross
The author is correct to ignore the Dr Jackson theory presented in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode since the writers & producers of the UFO strip in the Countdown comic have also ignored this. In 'The Snatch' serial the aliens on their homeworld are shown to be humanoid beings who all know how to perform organ transplants because they frequently require them in order live forever (ie: no 'formless beings' possessing earth abductees ala 'Captain Scarlett' etc). And since the Countdown comic is basically an Anderson production then the UFO strip is a definitive companion piece to the TV show (and the alien homeworld presented in the 'How it Ended' story does match this depiction in the comic, and so is arguably more 'canon' than the theories presented by Dr Jackson in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode etc).


Congratulations.  That's the most amazing post I have ever read re. UFO.  Ever!  As a youngster, I used to get 'Countdown' every week and it never occurred to me for one moment that the writers and artists on any strip (not just UFO) were more familiar with the format of the original series than the writers on the series itself!  That's an incredible claim!  Most writers and artists on comics have little interest in the subject matter... it's just work for them... and they work from (usually) the bear minimum of reference material.  It is hugely unlikely that the writer of 'The Snatch' would have watched 'The Cat with 10 Lives' and then sat there and thought about it to the degree that we have over the years!  The UFO strip in Countdown deviates from what is seen on TV in many ways.  Sorry, but to suggest that 'fan fiction' and comic strips are 'more canon' than what is presented on screen is somewhat wild to say the least!  

However, I'll admit that some of the ideas presented in this particular fan fiction story do sound intriguing and it's clear that some considerable thought has gone into it.  Calling the UFOs 'Spinners' is surprisingly apt.  Even if it does conjure up images of an Irish folk group.  Gerry Anderson's The Spinners - now there's a show that would have been worth watching!  

I think we shall have to agree to disagree.  Fan fiction, no matter how good, is still fan fiction and to suggest otherwise is a step too far.  
TRT
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

TRT
I’ve always thought there must be at least two castes of alien. The cost in resource terms for space travel... the limited numbers of visits and collections. They seem to take just one or two humans per trip.  Then there’s the psycho-control aspect... is there a psychic elite race on the home world who need a supplement of some form that can only be found in human brains? The other organs get used to patch up the few remaining space pilots... their use of human brain tissue allows them gradually greater control of human minds until they can possess them completely. Have they also been taking kitty cats? Then again there’s a lot to be said for leaving it all unresolved. Could that contribute to the show’s longevity?

Sent from my iOS device

On 21 Nov 2020, at 10:00, Clare Cross [via SHADO] <[hidden email]> wrote:

 The author is correct to ignore the Dr Jackson theory presented in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode since the writers & producers of the UFO strip in the Countdown comic have also ignored this. In 'The Snatch' serial the aliens on their homeworld are shown to be humanoid beings who all know how to perform organ transplants because they frequently require them in order live forever (ie: no 'formless beings' possessing earth abductees ala 'Captain Scarlett' etc). And since the Countdown comic is basically an Anderson production then the UFO strip is a definitive companion piece to the TV show (and the alien homeworld presented in the 'How it Ended' story does match this depiction in the comic, and so is arguably more 'canon' than the theories presented by Dr Jackson in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode etc).


Congratulations.  That's the most amazing post I have ever read re. UFO.  Ever!  As a youngster, I used to get 'Countdown' every week and it never occurred to me for one moment that the writers and artists on any strip (not just UFO) were more familiar with the format of the original series than the writers on the series itself!  That's an incredible claim!  Most writers and artists on comics have little interest in the subject matter... it's just work for them... and they work from (usually) the bear minimum of reference material.  It is hugely unlikely that the writer of 'The Snatch' would have watched 'The Cat with 10 Lives' and then sat there and thought about it to the degree that we have over the years!  The UFO strip in Countdown deviates from what is seen on TV in many ways.  Sorry, but to suggest that 'fan fiction' and comic strips are 'more canon' than what is presented on screen is somewhat wild to say the least!  

However, I'll admit that some of the ideas presented in this particular fan fiction story do sound intriguing and it's clear that some considerable thought has gone into it.  Calling the UFOs 'Spinners' is surprisingly apt.  Even if it does conjure up images of an Irish folk group.  Gerry Anderson's The Spinners - now there's a show that would have been worth watching!  

I think we shall have to agree to disagree.  Fan fiction, no matter how good, is still fan fiction and to suggest otherwise is a step too far.  


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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Lightcudder
I like to imagine that there were several different 'factions' on the alien planet - comparable to Russians, Americans, Chinese?? All fighting for 'supremacy' in space? Perhaps the aliens didnt need a massive amount of spare organs - perhaps they were growing them from tiny cells taken from the original organ. In which case Leila Carlin's heart might have provided new hearts for hundreds, if not thousands, of aliens?

The use of animals/ESP etc and the attempt to destroy Earth (Destruction) or cause a massive earthquake (Long Sleep) might  have been a separate faction who had a different agenda, such as creating a new home world?

Just a thought. But I agree that leaving it all unresolved keeps the tension going and adds to the mystery.
LtCdr: UFO fanfiction and other stuff!

http://lightcudder.com/
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Clare Cross
I think the important thing to remember, when talking about Dr. Jackson's outlandish theories, is that he could be wrong.  But then, he could be right.  We simply don't know for sure - and we certainly aren't in a position to state that he's wrong.  Remember; even if it's educated guesswork on his part, Jackson is probably far more educated and experienced than any of us and so what right do we have to dismiss his theories?  

That the Aliens are hundreds, if not thousands, of years ahead of us in terms of science and technology is undisputed, so yes, it is highly likely that they can replicate both human organs and whole human bodies.  There may be some circumstances where a whole body replication is preferable to transplanting organs (replicated organs or otherwise) and there must surely be plenty of occasions where a new heart, liver, set of lungs, is sufficient.  When it comes to replicating entire bodies, maybe the Aliens have a set limit on the number of times a body can be replicated - the limit may be self-imposed or just impossible to exceed.  Imagine if there were 10,000 exact duplicates (or doppelgangers !!!)  of yourself living on Earth.  How likely is it that you'd ever meet one?  Quite unlikely.  But if there were 100,000 or 1,000,000 it would be much more likely.

As for the whole B142 conundrum... sorry, I don't buy the whole installing an Alien engine block into the space probe.  But then, I don't buy the fact that the B142 would have been able to keep up with the UFO and reach its home planet and then send back images that take three or four months to get here.  Close Up has some nice moments, but it needed refining and at least one more re-write to iron out all the flaws.  It could have been done, but I guess they simply didn't have time.  The '1984' and '1981' comments in Computer Affair and Survival respectively are just another example of this.  I say, don't try to explain it and definitely don't try to contradict it.    There's enough re-writing of history going on at the moment in the world without adding to it!  

UFO is far from perfect... but it's perfect as it is.  
TRT
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

TRT
I took it that the B142 probe used a UTronic beam transmitter for instant communications and was piggybacking the UFO into whatever warped spacetime bubble their engines create. Thus the UFO’s journey also takes 3 months of Earth time but maybe less subjectively due to time dilation as we don’t know how fast the UFO is going measured inside the distortion bubble. I know that’s the Star Trek proposal for Warp Drive but it kind of works. 

Sent from my iOS device

On 21 Nov 2020, at 13:25, Clare Cross [via SHADO] <[hidden email]> wrote:

 I think the important thing to remember, when talking about Dr. Jackson's outlandish theories, is that he could be wrong.  But then, he could be right.  We simply don't know for sure - and we certainly aren't in a position to state that he's wrong.  Remember; even if it's educated guesswork on his part, Jackson is probably far more educated and experienced than any of us and so what right do we have to dismiss his theories?  

That the Aliens are hundreds, if not thousands, of years ahead of us in terms of science and technology, then, yes, it is highly likely that they can replicate both human organs and whole human bodies.  There may be some circumstances where a whole body replication is preferable to transplanting organs (replicated organs or otherwise) and there must surely be plenty of occasions where a new heart, liver, set of lungs, is sufficient.  When it comes to replicating entire bodies, maybe the Aliens have a set limit on the number of times a body can be replicated - the limit may be self-imposed or just impossible to exceed.  Imagine if there were 10,000 exact duplicates (or doppelgangers !!!)  of yourself living on Earth.  How likely is it that you'd ever meet one?  Quite unlikely.  But if there were 100,000 or 1,000,000 it would be much more likely.

As for the whole B142 conundrum... sorry, I don't buy the whole installing an Alien engine block into the space probe.  But then, I don't buy the fact that the B142 would have been able to keep up with the UFO and reach its home planet and then send back images that take three or four months to get here.  Close Up has some nice moments, but it needed refining and at least one more re-write to iron out all the flaws.  It could have been done, but I guess they simply didn't have time.  The '1984' and '1981' comments in Computer Affair and Survival respectively are just another example of this.  I say, don't try to explain it and definitely don't try to contradict it.    There's enough re-writing of history going on at the moment in the world without adding to it!  

UFO is far from perfect... but it's perfect as it is.  


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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Shado-cabinet
In reply to this post by Clare Cross
Hi Clare

The 'Spinners' were actually a Northern English folk-group, not an Irish one (same goes for Steeleye Span ;-)

Even if what you claim is correct and the writers of the UFO strip are not too familiar with the TV show (but tbh I have seen no strong evidence of this from the serials I have read so far) the editor & the publisher would had final say over which story would get published (and even Gerry Anderson would have been consulted over 'The Snatch' serial as it unveils the aliens & their homeworld) so the story is as 'canon' as it could possibly be for a show that had no 'story bible'.  I suppose the reason for the 'reveal-all nature' of 'The Snatch' was to up the ante of the UFO saga (since the serial was published in late Sept 1971 where I imagine the UFO show would have been finishing-up its broadcast run on UK TV) and keep the UFO franchise alive albeit in a weekly comic strip.

With regards to the Dr Jackson theory about the alien being 'formless' beings it really was that 'just a theory' which Dave Tomblin threw into the mix as part of his guest writer/ stint on UFO. It cannot be considered anyway 'canon' as none of the other episodes (written by a stable of writers) deal with this theory (in fact it contradicts most of the other episodes ie: IDENTIFIED, COMPUTER AFFAIR, ESP etc). Even the episode CAT WITH TEN LIVES itself doesn't deal with the 'formless being' theory as presented by Jackson (in the episode the Pilot Regan is merely brainwashed to carry out the aliens orders, and is not directly possessed by any 'formless being' etc).

To be honest in light of there being not much more 'official' UFO material out there (except for the odd UFO annual on the Fanderson site which is also 'technically' fanfiction as it is indeed produced by fans) the fanfiction stories like the excellent 'How it Ended' are the nearest we will ever get to 'Official' and 'Canon' for a TV show that is 50 years old.

So I would recommend that all UFO fans should temporarily set aside their feelings about 'fanfiction' and check out the story in the links I provided in my initial post :)
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Clare Cross
I'll admit that I was in error re. The Spinners.  I should have checked.  I'll blame it on the fact that my late (Irish) uncle Sean had a load of Spinners albums and I naturally drew a lazy but understandable conclusion.  Then again, I could have been thinking of The Chieftains.  

However... I'm so sorry but I sincerely hope you don't really believe this -

 (and even Gerry Anderson would have been consulted over 'The Snatch' serial as it unveils the aliens & their homeworld)

There is absolutely zero chance that this is even remotely true.  You're just making stuff up now!  Trust me.  

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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Shado-cabinet
In reply to this post by TRT
Hi TRT

I think in the initial concepts outlined by Anderson and his writers for the aliens were that they were from a homeworld consisting of 2 different factions battling each other on earth but this seemed to be dropped and the concept switched to be  'one race of aliens on a dying planet'. However the motives of the aliens in episodes like 'THE LONG SLEEP' and 'DESTRUCTION' seem to be different from those in the other episodes. And in ESP Straker seems to be talking (through the mind-controlled human) to 2 different alien leaders who appear to be 'different' (one is desperate and unstable, and the other is more calm & explains that they 'mean no harm to peoples of Earth') which implies that there my still be 2 different factions at odds with each other on how to deal with Earth.

In the 'How it Ended' story the author does have an alien base which is situated on an outpost planet far away from the alien homeworld (but is closer to Earth). It is this outpost that seems to be launching more attacks on Earth than the alien homeworld and appears to be populated by a more aggressive type of alien fanatic (although they are still taking orders from Robart on the alien homeworld) that appear to be fighting their own type of war against Earth (and would explain the more destructive missions against Earth ie: such as 'THE LONG SLEEP' and 'DESTRUCTION' etc )
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Shado-cabinet
In reply to this post by Clare Cross
Hi Clare

You are forgiven for the mix-up regarding the Spinners ;-)

Well obviously Gerry Anderson had some input over the UFO strip as he co-owned the company that published the Countdown comic (TV21 productions). And I am pretty sure he would have had a say over 'The Snatch' serial as it does something the show doesn't do which is fully reveal the aliens and their homeworld)

Even Star Wars creator George Lucas had some input over the Star Wars comic published by Marvel in the 70s (for example he would not let the Marvel writers do any 'crossover' stories between the 'Marvel Universe' and 'Star Wars'  -  thank God :)
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Shado-cabinet
In reply to this post by TRT
Hi TRT

Although I prefer the explanation offered in the 'How it Ended' story,  I do think your suggestion also works :)
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Clare Cross
In reply to this post by Shado-cabinet
The author is correct to ignore the Dr Jackson theory presented in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode since the writers & producers of the UFO strip in the Countdown comic have also ignored this. In 'The Snatch' serial the aliens on their homeworld are shown to be humanoid beings who all know how to perform organ transplants because they frequently require them in order live forever (ie: no 'formless beings' possessing earth abductees ala 'Captain Scarlett' etc). And since the Countdown comic is basically an Anderson production then the UFO strip is a definitive companion piece to the TV show (and the alien homeworld presented in the 'How it Ended' story does match this depiction in the comic, and so is arguably more 'canon' than the theories presented by Dr Jackson in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode etc).


Well obviously Gerry Anderson had some input over the UFO strip as he co-owned the company that published the Countdown comic (TV21 productions). And I am pretty sure he would have had a say over 'The Snatch' serial as it does something the show doesn't do which is fully reveal the aliens and their homeworld)


Shado-cabinet.  I am rather bemused as to why you cite 'The Snatch' as providing some kind of 'evidence' that Jackson's theory is rubbish.  Perhaps you could elaborate?  I'm not sure who wrote 'The Snatch', it could have been Dennis Hooper, but there is no reason to suppose that he was watching UFO every week and thinking "That's rubbish, I'll ignore that."  You also state that Countdown was '...an Anderson production'.  Not true.  Countdown was published by Polystyle Publications, which had no direct affiliation with Gerry Anderson or Century 21.  Yes, Dennis Hooper had worked on TV Century 21 , but this does not mean that Countdown came under the auspices of the Andersons as did the earlier comic.  Sorry, no disrespect intended, but you obviously don't know what you're talking about - see above quotes - and so I think it best if I leave it there.  
TRT
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

TRT
Dennis Hooper is listed as an editor of Countdown. 

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On 21 Nov 2020, at 19:25, Clare Cross [via SHADO] <[hidden email]> wrote:

 The author is correct to ignore the Dr Jackson theory presented in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode since the writers & producers of the UFO strip in the Countdown comic have also ignored this. In 'The Snatch' serial the aliens on their homeworld are shown to be humanoid beings who all know how to perform organ transplants because they frequently require them in order live forever (ie: no 'formless beings' possessing earth abductees ala 'Captain Scarlett' etc). And since the Countdown comic is basically an Anderson production then the UFO strip is a definitive companion piece to the TV show (and the alien homeworld presented in the 'How it Ended' story does match this depiction in the comic, and so is arguably more 'canon' than the theories presented by Dr Jackson in the 'Cat with 10 lives' episode etc).


Shado-cabinet.  I am rather bemused as to why you cite 'The Snatch' as providing some kind of 'evidence' that Jackson's theory is rubbish.  Perhaps you could elaborate?  I'm not sure who wrote 'The Snatch', it could have been Dennis Hooper, but there is no reason to suppose that he was watching UFO every week and thinking "That's rubbish, I'll ignore that."  You also state that Countdown was '...an Anderson production'.  Not true.  Countdown was published by Polystyle Publications, which had no direct affiliation with Gerry Anderson or Century 21.  Yes, Dennis Hooper had worked on TV Century 21 , but this does not mean that Countdown came under the auspices of the Andersons as did the earlier comic.  


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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Shado-cabinet
In reply to this post by Lightcudder
Hi Lightcudder

As I mentioned in my answer to TRT the initial concepts outlined by Anderson and his writers for the aliens were that they were from a homeworld consisting of 2 different factions battling each other on earth but this seemed to be dropped and the concept switched to be  'one race of aliens on a dying planet'.

However like you stated in your post the motives of the aliens in episodes like 'THE LONG SLEEP' and 'DESTRUCTION' seem to be different from those in the other episodes. And particularly in the ESP episode Straker seems to be talking (through the mind-controlled human) to 2 different alien leaders who appear to be 'different' (one is desperate and unstable, and the other is more calm & explains that they 'mean no harm to peoples of Earth') which implies that there my still be 2 different factions at odds with each other on how to deal with Earth.

In the 'How it Ended' story the author does have an alien base which is situated on an outpost planet far away from the alien homeworld (but is closer to Earth). The base is still under control from Robart 'the leader' on the alien homeworld but the aliens on this base appear to be fighting their own type of war against Earth (and would explain the more destructive missions against Earth ie: such as 'THE LONG SLEEP' and 'DESTRUCTION' etc ).

I look forward to reading your Shepherd novel, and if you like I will post a quick review for it on this forum once I have finished.  I do recommend that you check out the 'How it Ended' story as it is a very good read :)
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Shado-cabinet
In reply to this post by TRT
Hi TRT

Thanks for that info about the editor of Countdown :)
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Shado-cabinet
In reply to this post by Clare Cross
Hi Clare

I am pretty sure Anderson & co were consulted about 'The Snatch' serial even if it was just to provide more information about the aliens and their homeworld as this serial literally 'reveals everything' about these mysterious antagonists.  
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Clare Cross
In reply to this post by TRT
Dennis Hooper is listed as an editor of Countdown.

TRT - Yes.  I realise that.  I was pointing that out in my post.  What is your point?  

Countdown had NO direct link to Gerry or Sylvia Anderson.  It was published by Polystyle Publications and obtained a licence to reprint TV21 strips and create new strips based on UFO.  The writers and artists worked at an incredible pace and so the idea that they were overly familiar with the shows they were covering is not true.  Dennis Hooper was not being paid by Gerry Anderson.  Shado-cabinet seemed to believe that Countdown was published by Century 21, I was pointing out that this was not the case.  
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Re: Review for UFO: How it Ended (parts 1 and 2) by Anthony Appleyard

Clare Cross
In reply to this post by Shado-cabinet
I am pretty sure Anderson & co were consulted about 'The Snatch' serial even if it was just to provide more information about the aliens and their homeworld as this serial literally 'reveals everything' about these mysterious antagonists.  

Why are you 'pretty sure' ?  Have you ever worked in publishing or television?  Have you any idea at all how comics and comic strips are written, edited and produced?  Have you any idea how busy Gerry and Sylvia would have been during 1971-1972?  Do you really believe that they would have had time to advise the writer or editor of a comic on a TV show they created two or three years earlier?  

Incidentally, I pointed out (although obviously not clearly enough) that Dennis Hooper was editor of Countdown in my earlier post.  I'll also point out that he (in all probability) shared editing duties on Countown and TV Action with art editor Roger Perry.

There seems to be a lack of understanding here on the part of some and a breakdown in communication. So, I'll leave you to discuss fan fiction, Countdown and the level of Gerry's involvement with it.  Have fun.
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